Symbiotic relationship of a clownfish and sea anemone

Symbiosis - Clownfish and Sea Anemone by Laura Lacroix on Prezi

symbiotic relationship of a clownfish and sea anemone

Clownfish have evolved an ingenious though slimy way to use stinging anemones for their. Clownfish or the anemonefish are small fishes belonging to superclass Pisces and family Pomacentridae. There are about twenty nine species of clownfish are . Symbiosis is any type of a close and long-term biological interaction between two different Endosymbiosis is any symbiotic relationship in which one symbiont lives within the tissues of the An example of mutualism is the relationship between the ocellaris clownfish that dwell among the tentacles of Ritteri sea anemones.

Clown fish also provide the sea anemone with its excrement which makes up a large portion of the sea anemone diet alone. Also, the clown fish aid the sea anemone by using their bright colored gills to lure fish and other organisms into the sea anemone so the anemone can capture the lured prey.

Clownfish and Sea Anemones

Finally, the sea anemones profit from the clown fish by getting better water circulation throughout their whole body because the clown fish are constantly swimming throughout their tentacles. At the same time, the sea anemone provides the clown fish with protection against predators using its stinging tentacles.

The sea anemone also provides the clown fish with a substrate in which the clown fish can lay their eggs and be protected.

The sea anemone and clownfish are a great example of mutualism, meaning both species benefit from having the other around.

symbiotic relationship of a clownfish and sea anemone

The anemone protects the clownfish by concealing it within its poisonous arms, as well as leaving scraps of its meals for the clownfish to consume. In return, the clownfish rids the anemone of parasites, wards away predators, and even offers nutrients by way of its excrement. Clownfish The clownfish is a type of fish that lives in salt water habitats.

It is also called an Anemonefish. Clownfish get their name from the bold colored strokes on their body, like clowns face paint. The average size of Clownfish is three inches and most are brightly colored with white stripes on the head or side of the body.

Sea Anemone Sea anemones are marine animals in the Cnidaria phylum. These sea creatures are often mistaken as marine plants or flowers. The body is composed of a columnar structure, with one end of the column attacked to a substrate, and the other end houses the mouth and tentacle structures or nematocysts, a type of cnidae.

The cnidae or nematocysts contain stinging cells that paralyze the prey.

symbiotic relationship of a clownfish and sea anemone

Sea anemones do not actively seek food instead they are opportunistic feeders, meaning they wait for passing prey. They are found in coastal regions throughout the world, but mainly in warm temperate regions. What is Sea Anemone and Clownfish Relationship?

Investigation

Clownfish perform an elaborate dance with an anemone before taking up residence, gently touching its tentacles with different parts of their bodies until they are acclimated to their host. In exchange for safety from predators and food scraps, the clownfish drives off intruders and preens its host, removing parasites. In terms of signalling theorythe mimic and model have evolved to send a signal; the dupe has evolved to receive it from the model.

This is to the advantage of the mimic but to the detriment of both the model, whose protective signals are effectively weakened, and of the dupe, which is deprived of an edible prey. For example, a wasp is a strongly-defended model, which signals with its conspicuous black and yellow coloration that it is an unprofitable prey to predators such as birds which hunt by sight; many hoverflies are Batesian mimics of wasps, and any bird that avoids these hoverflies is a dupe.

Amensalism is an asymmetric interaction where one species is harmed or killed by the other, and one is unaffected by the other. Competition is where a larger or stronger organism deprives a smaller or weaker one from a resource.

Clownfish Biology

Antagonism occurs when one organism is damaged or killed by another through a chemical secretion. An example of competition is a sapling growing under the shadow of a mature tree.

The mature tree can rob the sapling of necessary sunlight and, if the mature tree is very large, it can take up rainwater and deplete soil nutrients. Throughout the process, the mature tree is unaffected by the sapling.

Sea Anemone and Clownfish relationship Commensalism

Indeed, if the sapling dies, the mature tree gains nutrients from the decaying sapling. An example of antagonism is Juglans nigra black walnutsecreting juglone, a substance which destroys many herbaceous plants within its root zone.

Whilst the presence of the grass causes negligible detrimental effects to the animal's hoof, the grass suffers from being crushed.