Obj meet the mayors committee from deer lick falls

obj meet the mayors committee from deer lick falls

Once, he was present at a meeting of the Church, when the .. After some treaty and delay, the troops of the great Earl and his sons began to fall off. .. The King's object was to seize upon the Duke's dominions. This had threatened that he should not live to eat a loaf of bread in England; but he came. We could not possibly reach every freemason and inform him of our intention to Dallas, Paulding co 2d and 4th Mondays High Falls, Cross Ridge, Butts .. Clayton co Friday on or before f. m. 71 Bluff City, Council Bluffs,Pottawatamie, . Crab Orchard, First Saturday Paint Lick, Garrard county, Saturday before. The Mayor's Committee from Deer Lick Falls Poster . the four businessmen who hire Rockford are from the fictional town of Deer Lick Falls, Michigan. No two ex -convicts are exactly alike though as we've met so many of James Garner's.

One of them, which I have seen, is so close to it that it is hollowed out underneath the ocean; and the miners say, that in stormy weather, when they are at work down in that deep place, they can hear the noise of the waves thundering above their heads.

So, the Phoenicians, coasting about the Islands, would come, without much difficulty, to where the tin and lead were.

The Phoenicians traded with the Islanders for these metals, and gave the Islanders some other useful things in exchange. The Islanders were, at first, poor savages, going almost naked, or only dressed in the rough skins of beasts, and staining their bodies, as other savages do, with coloured earths and the juices of plants. These people settled themselves on the south coast of England, which is now called Kent; and, although they were a rough people too, they taught the savage Britons some useful arts, and improved that part of the Islands.

It is probable that other people came over from Spain to Ireland, and settled there. Thus, by little and little, strangers became mixed with the Islanders, and the savage Britons grew into a wild, bold people; almost savage, still, especially in the interior of the country away from the sea where the foreign settlers seldom went; but hardy, brave, and strong.

The whole country was covered with forests, and swamps. The greater part of it was very misty and cold. There were no roads, no bridges, no streets, no houses that you would think deserving of the name. A town was nothing but a collection of straw-covered huts, hidden in a thick wood, with a ditch all round, and a low wall, made of mud, or the trunks of trees placed one upon another.

The people planted little or no corn, but lived upon the flesh of their flocks and cattle. They made no coins, but used metal rings for money. They were clever in basket-work, as savage people often are; and they could make a coarse kind of cloth, and some very bad earthenware. But in building fortresses they were much more clever. They made boats of basket-work, covered with the skins of animals, but seldom, if ever, ventured far from the shore.

They made swords, of copper mixed with tin; but, these swords were of an awkward shape, and so soft that a heavy blow would bend one.

They made light shields, short pointed daggers, and spears — which they jerked back after they had thrown them at an enemy, by a long strip of leather fastened to the stem. The ancient Britons, being divided into as many as thirty or forty tribes, each commanded by its own little king, were constantly fighting with one another, as savage people usually do; and they always fought with these weapons. They were very fond of horses. The standard of Kent was the picture of a white horse.

They could break them in and manage them wonderfully well. Indeed, the horses of which they had an abundance, though they were rather small were so well taught in those days, that they can scarcely be said to have improved since; though the men are so much wiser. They understood, and obeyed, every word of command; and would stand still by themselves, in all the din and noise of battle, while their masters went to fight on foot.

The Britons could not have succeeded in their most remarkable art, without the aid of these sensible and trusty animals. The art I mean, is the construction and management of war-chariots or cars, for which they have ever been celebrated in history.

Each of the best sort of these chariots, not quite breast high in front, and open at the back, contained one man to drive, and two or three others to fight — all standing up. The men within would leap out, deal blows about them with their swords like hail, leap on the horses, on the pole, spring back into the chariots anyhow; and, as soon as they were safe, the horses tore away again.

The Britons had a strange and terrible religion, called the Religion of the Druids. It seems to have been brought over, in very early times indeed, from the opposite country of France, anciently called Gaul, and to have mixed up the worship of the Serpent, and of the Sun and Moon, with the worship of some of the Heathen Gods and Goddesses. But it is certain that the Druidical ceremonies included the sacrifice of human victims, the torture of some suspected criminals, and, on particular occasions, even the burning alive, in immense wicker cages, of a number of men and animals together.

The Druid Priests had some kind of veneration for the Oak, and for the mistletoe — the same plant that we hang up in houses at Christmas Time now — when its white berries grew upon the Oak. They met together in dark woods, which they called Sacred Groves; and there they instructed, in their mysterious arts, young men who came to them as pupils, and who sometimes stayed with them as long as twenty years. These Druids built great Temples and altars, open to the sky, fragments of some of which are yet remaining.

Stonehenge, on Salisbury Plain, in Wiltshire, is the most extraordinary of these.

Gordon Brennan | Controlled, Balanced, CHANGE, No Spin, Period!

We know, from examination of the great blocks of which such buildings are made, that they could not have been raised without the aid of some ingenious machines, which are common now, but which the ancient Britons certainly did not use in making their own uncomfortable houses.

I should not wonder if the Druids, and their pupils who stayed with them twenty years, knowing more than the rest of the Britons, kept the people out of sight while they made these buildings, and then pretended that they built them by magic.

Such was the improved condition of the ancient Britons, fifty-five years before the birth of Our Saviour, when the Romans, under their great General, Julius Caesar, were masters of all the rest of the known world. Julius Caesar had then just conquered Gaul; and hearing, in Gaul, a good deal about the opposite Island with the white cliffs, and about the bravery of the Britons who inhabited it — some of whom had been fetched over to help the Gauls in the war against him — he resolved, as he was so near, to come and conquer Britain next.

So, Julius Caesar came sailing over to this Island of ours, with eighty vessels and twelve thousand men. He expected to conquer Britain easily: However, for once that the bold Britons beat him, he beat them twice; though not so soundly but that he was very glad to accept their proposals of peace, and go away.

But, in the spring of the next year, he came back; this time, with eight hundred vessels and thirty thousand men. A brave general he was, and well he and his soldiers fought the Roman army! So well, that whenever in that war the Roman soldiers saw a great cloud of dust, and heard the rattle of the rapid British chariots, they trembled in their hearts.

As the other British chiefs were jealous of him, and were always quarrelling with him, and with one another, he gave up, and proposed peace. Julius Caesar was very glad to grant peace easily, and to go away again with all his remaining ships and men. He had expected to find pearls in Britain, and he may have found a few for anything I know; but, at all events, he found delicious oysters, and I am sure he found tough Britons — of whom, I dare say, he made the same complaint as Napoleon Bonaparte the great French General did, eighteen hundred years afterwards, when he said they were such unreasonable fellows that they never knew when they were beaten.

They never DID know, I believe, and never will. Nearly a hundred years passed on, and all that time, there was peace in Britain. The Britons improved their towns and mode of life: Some of the British Chiefs of Tribes submitted. Others resolved to fight to the death. Your liberty, or your eternal slavery, dates from this hour.

Remember your brave ancestors, who drove the great Caesar himself across the sea! But the strong Roman swords and armour were too much for the weaker British weapons in close conflict. The Britons lost the day. But a great man will be great in misfortune, great in prison, great in chains. His noble air, and dignified endurance of distress, so touched the Roman people who thronged the streets to see him, that he and his family were restored to freedom.

No one knows whether his great heart broke, and he died in Rome, or whether he ever returned to his own dear country. They rose again and again, and died by thousands, sword in hand. They rose, on every possible occasion. To avenge this injury, the Britons rose, with all their might and rage.

They drove CATUS into Gaul; they laid the Roman possessions waste; they forced the Romans out of London, then a poor little town, but a trading place; they hanged, burnt, crucified, and slew by the sword, seventy thousand Romans in a few days. They strengthened their army, and desperately attacked his, on the field where it was strongly posted.

Before the first charge of the Britons was made, BOADICEA, in a war-chariot, with her fair hair streaming in the wind, and her injured daughters lying at her feet, drove among the troops, and cried to them for vengeance on their oppressors, the licentious Romans.

The Britons fought to the last; but they were vanquished with great slaughter, and the unhappy queen took poison. Still, the spirit of the Britons was not broken. They fought the bloodiest battles with him; they killed their very wives and children, to prevent his making prisoners of them; they fell, fighting, in such great numbers that certain hills in Scotland are yet supposed to be vast heaps of stones piled up above their graves. SEVERUS came, nearly a hundred years afterwards, and they worried his great army like dogs, and rejoiced to see them die, by thousands, in the bogs and swamps.

He knew how little that would do. He yielded up a quantity of land to the Caledonians, and gave the Britons the same privileges as the Romans possessed. There was peace, after this, for seventy years. Then new enemies arose. They were the Saxons, a fierce, sea-faring people from the countries to the North of the Rhine, the great river of Germany on the banks of which the best grapes grow to make the German wine.

obj meet the mayors committee from deer lick falls

They began to come, in pirate ships, to the sea-coast of Gaul and Britain, and to plunder them. But, after this time, they renewed their ravages. A few years more, and the Scots which was then the name for the people of Irelandand the Picts, a northern people, began to make frequent plundering incursions into the South of Britain.

All these attacks were repeated, at intervals, during two hundred years, and through a long succession of Roman Emperors and chiefs; during all which length of time, the Britons rose against the Romans, over and over again. And still, at last, as at first, the Britons rose against them, in their old brave manner; for, a very little while before, they had turned away the Roman magistrates, and declared themselves an independent people.

obj meet the mayors committee from deer lick falls

In the course of that time, although they had been the cause of terrible fighting and bloodshed, they had done much to improve the condition of the Britons.

They had made great military roads; they had built forts; they had taught them how to dress, and arm themselves, much better than they had ever known how to do before; they had refined the whole British way of living.

Above all, it was in the Roman time, and by means of Roman ships, that the Christian Religion was first brought into Britain, and its people first taught the great lesson that, to be good in the sight of GOD, they must love their neighbours as themselves, and do unto others as they would be done by. The Druids declared that it was very wicked to believe in any such thing, and cursed all the people who did believe it, very heartily. But, when the people found that they were none the better for the blessings of the Druids, and none the worse for the curses of the Druids, but, that the sun shone and the rain fell without consulting the Druids at all, they just began to think that the Druids were mere men, and that it signified very little whether they cursed or blessed.

obj meet the mayors committee from deer lick falls

After which, the pupils of the Druids fell off greatly in numbers, and the Druids took to other trades. Thus I have come to the end of the Roman time in England.

obj meet the mayors committee from deer lick falls

It is but little that is known of those five hundred years; but some remains of them are still found. Often, when labourers are digging up the ground, to make foundations for houses or churches, they light on rusty money that once belonged to the Romans. Wells that the Romans sunk, still yield water; roads that the Romans made, form part of our highways. In some old battle-fields, British spear-heads and Roman armour have been found, mingled together in decay, as they fell in the thick pressure of the fight.

Traces of Roman camps overgrown with grass, and of mounds that are the burial-places of heaps of Britons, are to be seen in almost all parts of the country.

Across the bleak moors of Northumberland, the wall of SEVERUS, overrun with moss and weeds, still stretches, a strong ruin; and the shepherds and their dogs lie sleeping on it in the summer weather.

On Salisbury Plain, Stonehenge yet stands: They plundered the richest towns, and killed the people; and came back so often for more booty and more slaughter, that the unfortunate Britons lived a life of terror. As if the Picts and Scots were not bad enough on land, the Saxons attacked the islanders by sea; and, as if something more were still wanting to make them miserable, they quarrelled bitterly among themselves as to what prayers they ought to say, and how they ought to say them.

The priests, being very angry with one another on these questions, cursed one another in the heartiest manner; and uncommonly like the old Druids cursed all the people whom they could not persuade. So, altogether, the Britons were very badly off, you may believe. At last, the Britons, unable to bear their hard condition any longer, resolved to make peace with the Saxons, and to invite the Saxons to come into their country, and help them to keep out the Picts and Scots.

Both of these names, in the old Saxon language, signify Horse; for the Saxons, like many other nations in a rough state, were fond of giving men the names of animals, as Horse, Wolf, Bear, Hound. The Indians of North America, — a very inferior people to the Saxons, though — do the same to this day. Be favourable to them, as you loved that Saxon girl who gave you the golden goblet of wine at the feast! We must all die! In the course of years, VORTIGERN died — he was dethroned, and put in prison, first, I am afraid; and ROWENA died; and generations of Saxons and Britons died; and events that happened during a long, long time, would have been quite forgotten but for the tales and songs of the old Bards, who used to go about from feast to feast, with their white beards, recounting the deeds of their forefathers.

But, whether such a person really lived, or whether there were several persons whose histories came to be confused together under that one name, or whether all about him was invention, no one knows. I will tell you, shortly, what is most interesting in the early Saxon times, as they are described in these songs and stories of the Bards.

One body, conquering the Britons in the East, and settling there, called their kingdom Essex; another body settled in the West, and called their kingdom Wessex; the Northfolk, or Norfolk people, established themselves in one place; the Southfolk, or Suffolk people, established themselves in another; and gradually seven kingdoms or states arose in England, which were called the Saxon Heptarchy.

The poor Britons, falling back before these crowds of fighting men whom they had innocently invited over as friends, retired into Wales and the adjacent country; into Devonshire, and into Cornwall.

Those parts of England long remained unconquered. After the death of ETHELBERT, EDWIN, King of Northumbria, who was such a good king that it was said a woman or child might openly carry a purse of gold, in his reign, without fear, allowed his child to be baptised, and held a great council to consider whether he and his people should all be Christians or not.

It was decided that they should be. COIFI, the chief priest of the old religion, made a great speech on the occasion. In this discourse, he told the people that he had found out the old gods to be impostors.

I have been serving them all my life, and they have done nothing for me; whereas, if they had been really powerful, they could not have decently done less, in return for all I have done for them, than make my fortune. As they have never made my fortune, I am quite convinced they are impostors! From that time, the Christian religion spread itself among the Saxons, and became their faith. One day, she mixed a cup of poison for a certain noble belonging to the court; but her husband drank of it too, by mistake, and died.

When years had passed away, some travellers came home from Italy, and said that in the town of Pavia they had seen a ragged beggar-woman, who had once been handsome, but was then shrivelled, bent, and yellow, wandering about the streets, crying for bread; and that this beggar-woman was the poisoning English queen. And now, new enemies arose, who, for a long time, troubled England sorely. They were a warlike people, quite at home upon the sea; not Christians; very daring and cruel.

They came over in ships, and plundered and burned wheresoever they landed. But, they cared no more for being beaten than the English themselves. Then, they proposed to him that he should change his religion; but he, being a good Christian, steadily refused. Upon that, they beat him, made cowardly jests upon him, all defenceless as he was, shot arrows at him, and, finally, struck off his head.

It is impossible to say whose head they might have struck off next, but for the death of KING ETHELRED from a wound he had received in fighting against them, and the succession to his throne of the best and wisest king that ever lived in England.

A Child’s History of England / by Charles Dickens

Twice in his childhood, he had been taken to Rome, where the Saxon nobles were in the habit of going on journeys which they supposed to be religious; and, once, he had stayed for some time in Paris. But he had — as most men who grow up to be great and good are generally found to have had — an excellent mother; and, one day, this lady, whose name was OSBURGA, happened, as she was sitting among her sons, to read a book of Saxon poetry.

He was proud of it, all his life. This great king, in the first year of his reign, fought nine battles with the Danes. He made some treaties with them too, by which the false Danes swore they would quit the country. They pretended to consider that they had taken a very solemn oath, in swearing this upon the holy bracelets that they wore, and which were always buried with them when they died; but they cared little for it, for they thought nothing of breaking oaths and treaties too, as soon as it suited their purpose, and coming back again to fight, plunder, and burn, as usual.

But, being at work upon his bow and arrows, with which he hoped to punish the false Danes when a brighter time should come, and thinking deeply of his poor unhappy subjects whom the Danes chased through the land, his noble mind forgot the cakes, and they were burnt. The loss of their standard troubled the Danes greatly, for they believed it to be enchanted — woven by the three daughters of one father in a single afternoon — and they had a story among themselves that when they were victorious in battle, the Raven stretched his wings and seemed to fly; and that when they were defeated, he would droop.

He had good reason to droop, now, if he could have done anything half so sensible; for, KING ALFRED joined the Devonshire men; made a camp with them on a piece of firm ground in the midst of a bog in Somersetshire; and prepared for a great attempt for vengeance on the Danes, and the deliverance of his oppressed people.

But, first, as it was important to know how numerous those pestilent Danes were, and how they were fortified, KING ALFRED, being a good musician, disguised himself as a glee-man or minstrel, and went, with his harp, to the Danish camp. While he seemed to think of nothing but his music, he was watchful of their tents, their arms, their discipline, everything that he desired to know. And right soon did this great king entertain them to a different tune; for, summoning all his true followers to meet him at an appointed place, where they received him with joyful shouts and tears, as the monarch whom many of them had given up for lost or dead, he put himself at their head, marched on the Danish camp, defeated the Danes with great slaughter, and besieged them for fourteen days to prevent their escape.

But, being as merciful as he was good and brave, he then, instead of killing them, proposed peace: The Danes under him were faithful too.

They plundered and burned no more, but worked like honest men. They ploughed, and sowed, and reaped, and led good honest English lives. For three years, there was a war with these Danes; and there was a famine in the country, too, and a plague, both upon human creatures and beasts.

But KING ALFRED, whose mighty heart never failed him, built large ships nevertheless, with which to pursue the pirates on the sea; and he encouraged his soldiers, by his brave example, to fight valiantly against them on the shore. At last, he drove them all away; and then there was repose in England.

He loved to talk with clever men, and with travellers from foreign countries, and to write down what they told him, for his people to read. He had studied Latin after learning to read English, and now another of his labours was, to translate Latin books into the English-Saxon tongue, that his people might be interested, and improved by their contents.

He made just laws, that they might live more happily and freely; he turned away all partial judges, that no wrong might be done them; he was so careful of their property, and punished robbers so severely, that it was a common thing to say that under the great KING ALFRED, garlands of golden chains and jewels might have hung across the streets, and no man would have touched one.

He founded schools; he patiently heard causes himself in his Court of Justice; the great desires of his heart were, to do right to all his subjects, and to leave England better, wiser, happier in all ways, than he found it.

His industry in these efforts was quite astonishing. Every day he divided into certain portions, and in each portion devoted himself to a certain pursuit. That he might divide his time exactly, he had wax torches or candles made, which were all of the same size, were notched across at regular distances, and were always kept burning. Thus, as the candles burnt down, he divided the day into notches, almost as accurately as we now divide it into hours upon the clock.

But when the candles were first invented, it was found that the wind and draughts of air, blowing into the palace through the doors and windows, and through the chinks in the walls, caused them to gutter and burn unequally.

To prevent this, the King had them put into cases formed of wood and white horn. And these were the first lanthorns ever made in England. All this time, he was afflicted with a terrible unknown disease, which caused him violent and frequent pain that nothing could relieve. He bore it, as he had borne all the troubles of his life, like a brave good man, until he was fifty-three years old; and then, having reigned thirty years, he died.

He died in the year nine hundred and one; but, long ago as that is, his fame, and the love and gratitude with which his subjects regarded him, are freshly remembered to the present hour. He gradually extended his power over the whole of England, and so the Seven Kingdoms were united into one.

The Mayor's Committee from Deer Lick Falls

When England thus became one kingdom, ruled over by one Saxon king, the Saxons had been settled in the country more than four hundred and fifty years. Great changes had taken place in its customs during that time. The Saxons were still greedy eaters and great drinkers, and their feasts were often of a noisy and drunken kind; but many new comforts and even elegances had become known, and were fast increasing.

Hangings for the walls of rooms, where, in these modern days, we paste up paper, are known to have been sometimes made of silk, ornamented with birds and flowers in needlework.

Tables and chairs were curiously carved in different woods; were sometimes decorated with gold or silver; sometimes even made of those precious metals. Knives and spoons were used at table; golden ornaments were worn — with silk and cloth, and golden tissues and embroideries; dishes were made of gold and silver, brass and bone. There were varieties of drinking-horns, bedsteads, musical instruments.

A harp was passed round, at a feast, like the drinking-bowl, from guest to guest; and each one usually sang or played when his turn came. The weapons of the Saxons were stoutly made, and among them was a terrible iron hammer that gave deadly blows, and was long remembered. The Saxons themselves were a handsome people.

The men were proud of their long fair hair, parted on the forehead; their ample beards, their fresh complexions, and clear eyes. The beauty of the Saxon women filled all England with a new delight and grace.

It has been the greatest character among the nations of the earth. Wherever the descendants of the Saxon race have gone, have sailed, or otherwise made their way, even to the remotest regions of the world, they have been patient, persevering, never to be broken in spirit, never to be turned aside from enterprises on which they have resolved.

In Europe, Asia, Africa, America, the whole world over; in the desert, in the forest, on the sea; scorched by a burning sun, or frozen by ice that never melts; the Saxon blood remains unchanged.

Wheresoever that race goes, there, law, and industry, and safety for life and property, and all the great results of steady perseverance, are certain to arise. I pause to think with admiration, of the noble king who, in his single person, possessed all the Saxon virtues.

Whom misfortune could not subdue, whom prosperity could not spoil, whose perseverance nothing could shake. Who was hopeful in defeat, and generous in success. Who loved justice, freedom, truth, and knowledge. Who, in his care to instruct his people, probably did more to preserve the beautiful old Saxon language, than I can imagine.

Without whom, the English tongue in which I tell this story might have wanted half its meaning.

obj meet the mayors committee from deer lick falls

As it is said that his spirit still inspires some of our best English laws, so, let you and I pray that it may animate our English hearts, at least to this — to resolve, when we see any of our fellow-creatures left in ignorance, that we will do our best, while life is in us, to have them taught; and to tell those rulers whose duty it is to teach them, and who neglect their duty, that they have profited very little by all the years that have rolled away since the year nine hundred and one, and that they are far behind the bright example of KING ALFRED THE GREAT.

He reigned only fifteen years; but he remembered the glory of his grandfather, the great Alfred, and governed England well. He reduced the turbulent people of Wales, and obliged them to pay him a tribute in money, and in cattle, and to send him their best hawks and hounds. He was victorious over the Cornish men, who were not yet quite under the Saxon government.

He restored such of the old laws as were good, and had fallen into disuse; made some wise new laws, and took care of the poor and weak. After that, he had a quiet reign; the lords and ladies about him had leisure to become polite and agreeable; and foreign princes were glad as they have sometimes been since to come to England on visits to the English court.

He was the first of six boy-kings, as you will presently know. They called him the Magnificent, because he showed a taste for improvement and refinement. But he was beset by the Danes, and had a short and troubled reign, which came to a troubled end.

One night, when he was feasting in his hall, and had eaten much and drunk deep, he saw, among the company, a noted robber named LEOF, who had been banished from England. Command that robber to depart! Upon that the King rose from his seat, and, making passionately at the robber, and seizing him by his long hair, tried to throw him down.

But the robber had a dagger underneath his cloak, and, in the scuffle, stabbed the King to death. You may imagine what rough lives the kings of those times led, when one of them could struggle, half drunk, with a public robber in his own dining-hall, and be stabbed in presence of the company who ate and drank with him. And his armies fought the Northmen, the Danes, and Norwegians, or the Sea-Kings, as they were called, and beat them for the time.

And, in nine years, Edred died, and passed away. Dunstan was then Abbot of Glastonbury Abbey, whither the body of King Edmund the Magnificent was carried, to be buried. While yet a boy, he had got out of his bed one night being then in a feverand walked about Glastonbury Church when it was under repair; and, because he did not tumble off some scaffolds that were there, and break his neck, it was reported that he had been shown over the building by an angel.

He had also made a harp that was said to play of itself — which it very likely did, as AEolian Harps, which are played by the wind, and are understood now, always do. For these wonders he had been once denounced by his enemies, who were jealous of his favour with the late King Athelstan, as a magician; and he had been waylaid, bound hand and foot, and thrown into a marsh.

But he got out again, somehow, to cause a great deal of trouble yet. The priests of those days were, generally, the only scholars. They were learned in many things. Having to make their own convents and monasteries on uncultivated grounds that were granted to them by the Crown, it was necessary that they should be good farmers and good gardeners, or their lands would have been too poor to support them.

We have performed our part faithfully, and have even done more than we promised. The lists of lodges and their places of meeting are complete, and the times of meeting are all correct so far as we could get the information, which, in some few cases, was impossible.

To the freemasons of the city of New-York we refer with much pride as appreciating the value of the publication, and, indeed, to the members of the order generally wherever the work was brought to their notice.

Considering the vastness of the undertaking, and the limited time and little help we had, we have accomplished fully as much as was reasonably to be expected. The arrangement of the work we believe to be perfect.

The lodges are arranged numerically in each jurisdiction, and the States and territories of the United States in alphabetical order.

The subscribers' names are also arranged in alphabetical order in each State, and where five or more subscribers resided in one town we have placed the name of the town in a separate line, above the names of the subscribers.

The proper names of the subscribers precede the given or Christian, as in all directories. The typography of the work cannot be excelled. The type being all new; the paper is of a superior quality, and the binding neat and substantial.

No expense has been spared in the getting up of the book. District of Colu bia Be ; Dexter, Washtenaw Co. Cincinnati, ; Birmingham, ; Rhode Island Mount Gilead, Morrow Co. Washington, Clinton, Greene co Second Saturdly. John's, Holly Springs, Ouachita, Friday on or bef. Nation, 94 Richmond, Richmond, St.

Kane, Nevada, Nevada co Friday pre. Louis, Sierra co Sat. Joaquin Saturday on or b. Mark's, Fiddletown, Amador, Saturday next f. Valley, Foreman's Ranche, S. Joaquin co Fourth Tuesday U. Napa City, Napa City. John's, Middletown, st Friday, Mar.

Bridgeport, Every Wednesday 4 Do. Hartford, 1st and 3d Wed. John's, Norwalk, Thursday on or beff. Mark's, Tariffville, Wednesday on or b. Luke's, Kent, Tuesday before f. Andrew's, West Winsted, Wednesday before f. John's, New-Castle, Wednesday before f. Amelia, Fernandina, 1st and 8d Thursdays U. Patrick's, Danville, Sumter co Friday before f.